Tag Archives for " food safety "

It’s World Food Safety Day!

The theme of the first-ever World Food Safety Day is “Food Safety, everyone’s business”.

Everybody has a role to play from farm to table to ensure the food we consume is safe.

The World Health Organisation and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are promoting the message that food safety is a shared responsibility between government, industry and consumers.

A lack of knowledge about how to safely prepare certain foods is leaving many Australians at risk of food poisoning, a report from the Food Safety Information Council has found. click here to watch the full report on SBS World News Radio.

Food safety is a shared, social responsibility. Ensure you and your team are fully trained. Email us or enrol today!

Melbourne Eastern Suburbs – Food Safety Class

Food Safety level 1 and Food Safety Supervisor class will be held on Friday 14 June, commence 9:00am.

Where: Park Orchards Learning Centre, 572 Park Road, Park Orchards

Ideal for those seeking work or working in the hospitality industry, intending to start their own restaurant/take away business, working with children/ aged care workers, school canteens, people selling food at markets. All assessments completed in class on the day.

Click here for more information or to enrol.

It’s Food Allergy Week. Be Aware. Show You Care.

It’s Food Allergy Week, an initiative by Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia that aims to increase community awareness about food allergy in an effort to promote understanding and ultimately help protect those at risk.

Over half a million Aussies have a diagnosed food allergy and research shows this number is growing. It is vital that food handlers are aware of the 10 declared food allergies. Download our free poster to display in your kitchen.

With one in 10 children developing an allergy before their first birthday, Australia has one of the highest rates of food allergies in the world.

Whilst 90% of food allergic reactions are caused by 10 foods, there are more than 170 foods known to be triggers. Bananas, kiwi fruit, mustard and celery just to name a few.

Talk to us about updating your food safety training.

Safe seafood for Easter!

Follow our food safety tips to keep your seafood safe over Easter.

Easter is Australia’s biggest time for eating seafood. Here are a few tips to keep your Easter safe-

  1. Only purchase your seafood from a registered seafood supplier and check it is visibly fresh and is displayed chilled.
  2. Transport your seafood home from the retailer in a cooler with enough ice blocks or ice to keep it chilled.
  3. Once home put seafood in the fridge in a covered container and make sure your fridge is running at 5°C or below. Live shellfish, such as oysters, should be kept on ice and consumed as soon as possible after shucking.
  4. If the seafood is going to be cooked this will kill most bacteria but there could be a slight risk if it is consumed raw, for example raw oysters, sushi, sashimi. You will need to be particularly careful and hygienic in preparing these raw foods and also handling pre-cooked seafood such as cooked prawns.
  5. Seafood eaten raw or cold cooked prawns are not recommended for pregnant women, people with reduced immune systems or the elderly because of the risk of Listeria.
  6. Consume prawns and live shellfish as soon as possible after purchase when they are at their best and use other refrigerated seafood within 2 to 3 days.

Importantly if you are serving food for consumption make sure your food safety training is up to date. 

CFT International, RTO 21120, is the leading provider of food safety training in Australia.  Visit our website to enrol CFT International.

Easter Egg safety tips

Here are some important tips from CFT to keep your Easter Eggs safe.

Easter is just around the corner.  Here are some important food safety tips to remember this time of year when you’re decorating, cooking and/or hiding Easter eggs:

  • Be sure and inspect the eggs before purchasing them, making sure they are not dirty or cracked. Dangerous bacteria may enter a cracked egg.
  • Store eggs in their original cartons in the refrigerator rather than in the refrigerator door.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly with hot soapy water and rinse them before handling the eggs when cooking, cooling, dyeing and hiding them.  Thoroughly wash utensils, counter tops and anything else the eggs will come into contact with.
  • It’s a good idea to use one set of eggs for dyeing, decorating and hunting and a second set for eating. If you’re planning to eat the Easter eggs you dye, use food-grade dyes only.
  • If you’re having an Easter egg hunt, consider your hiding places carefully. Avoid areas where the eggs might come into contact with pets, wild animals, birds, reptiles, insects or lawn chemicals.
  • Make sure you find all the eggs you’ve hidden and then refrigerate them within two hours. Discard any cracked eggs. As long as the eggs are NOT out of refrigeration for more than two hours, they will be safe to eat. Do not eat eggs that have been out of refrigeration for more than two hours.
  • Throw cooked eggs away after 7 days.
  • Or, you can use colorful plastic Easter eggs with treats or toys inside for your Easter egg hunt.

Enrol into CFT food safety training to stay up to date with food safety awareness.

Happy Easter!

Listeria. How to avoid it!

What is Listeria? Listeria is a bacteria that lives in natural environments, like food.

Listeria doesn’t usually effect healthy people. But it can cause severe illness in certain community groups include elderly, sick, pregnant, unborn babies and people with compromised immune systems.

To reduce the risk of listeria infection, follow these simple steps –

  1. Wash your hands properly using the 20 second rule;
  2. Wash fruit and vegies thoroughly;
  3. Avoid cross contamination by using separate knives and chopping boards;
  4. Store leftovers safely and eat them within 24 hours;
  5. Reheat leftovers until steaming hot.

To find out more visit www.foodstandards.gov.au/listeria

To update your food safety skills enrol with CFT today!

What you need to know about food recalls

Rachel Clemens from Choice magazine wrote the following advice about why food recalls happen, and how to find out about them.

“At least one food product is pulled from shelves each week in Australia. 

Considering the millions of different foods you can buy from supermarkets and other food retailers, it’s a tiny proportion. 

But the potential harm to us if these recalls didn’t happen – or if we’re not aware of them – can be significant. In some cases it’s a matter of life and death.

So what causes food recalls, and how do you make sure you know about them?” click here to read the full article.

Urgent Egg Recall

Any consumers who have purchased eggs that have been produced by Bridgewater Poultry should return them to the place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them in the rubbish bin. DO NOT dispose of these eggs in a compost bin. Click here for the eggs produced by Bridgewater Poultry.

Consumers are also advised they MUST NOT feed these eggs to any domestic animals or livestock.

Anyone experiencing symptoms of Salmonella infection, also known as salmonellosis, should see their doctor.

Everyday things that can make you sick, surprise!

And, quite a few of them are related to food handling and food hygiene.

Business Insider Australia consulted medical experts and discovered a few things which seemed harmless could actually assist in making us sick. Here’s a few of them-

  • Washing raw meat actually increases your chances of getting food poisoning
  • The ‘5-second rule,’ can be risky!
  • Drinking out of public drinking fountains can harbour cold and flu viruses
  • Touching your face can spread viruses
  • Thawing food at room temperature gives bacteria time to breed


And there are a few more points listed. To read the full article published by Business Insider Australia, click here.

Update your food handling skills with CFT Food Safety training.